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of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations felt in every one of those country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain, it's a low boil, ready to burst out in a way that would affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there's two problems at the far end of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on one hand and spread of al-qaeda and spread of terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate unless we forget within a year of taking office, both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challengedded their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush, and the arab spring for president obama. there's a lot on the agenda. today, we're going to take an early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now, we, at the washington institute, for us, this is just the beginning of a -- of quite a number of events and an undertaking producing a series of transition issues on key issues, and research staff and by outsi
to universities. they focus on the violence and syria and the challenges each jet phases going forward. this is about an hour. >> good morning. i am bill clifford, president and ceo of world boston. as we head into the ultimate panel, assessing the aftermath of the arabs bring, please allow me to think todd culpeper, president and ceo of the world affairs council of america, his crack staff, national council chair, lori murray, and our many sponsors for this significantly stimulating conference thus far. [applause] like america, i am awash in debt it is time to make good on those obligations to each year on the panel, who i'm honored to present. i have had the pleasure of hearing at dozens of universities in the boston area. i am telling you a way overdue invitation to our counsel downtown. the professor is a senior fellow at the sovran center at brookings institution, a distinguished former adviser to my current adviser to many government agencies, u.s. leaders, and diplomats, and a prolific and best-selling author let me quote from the top of his website at the university of maryland
, including a look at military power and the situation in syria. in a little more than two hours, sent a leader harry reid on the filibuster. after that, we will re-air the comments of chief justice roberts at rice university. >> on tomorrow morning's "washington journal", gas prices and alternative energy efforts. long-term unemployment benefits and why they may end in january without congressional action is discussed. after that, dominic chu describes what wall street investors are doing with their money in excess of the fiscal cliff. close plus your e-mails and phone calls and tweets. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> you are watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs. weekdays featuring live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights, watch key public policy events, and every weekend, the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules on the website and join in the the conversation on social media sites. >> representatives met in nova scotia earlier this month before the house. this is one hour and
know that other countries have the capability k and the other countries would mess up the syria intertwined with there's unlike x land there could be others we haven't picked up that developed the capability and we have overlooked it. the reason that we've called it payback and why people are saying there may be payback is that we have been the leader imposing sanctions, both diplomatic sanctions come export sanctions, financial sanctions. "the washington post" ran a series of articles about the covert activities but we are offering to comment because the cabinet isn't clear to know the "washington post" stories they are reading our true. we aren't going to talk about those articles but i think the point is from the perspective, they read "the washington post" and they may believe that the "washington post" articles are true and not those activities the talk about, so that may lead them to say if they are doing this stuff why shouldn't we be investing it and doing it to them? >> thank you. the national security adviser assists they've now been disrupted. there are signs this eve
in syria. if you see a big argument about whether or not the united states needs to be centrally involved in issues in which its interests may not be completely vital and that's a big change for the world. that may be the new normal. >> every list i forgot something. halifax is nothing if not cutting-edge. you are all encouraged to tweet or have your aides tweaked whatever insights you may find. the hash tag is halifax 2012 and we are going to have a force multiplier and social media realm about the brilliant insights that are here. you'll be the first one has actually treated. >> seen from europe the new normal that i can see doesn't look so dramatically different from the old normal. it has become popular in europe to speak of the decline of america to name just one example. spiegel had a cover story about the six superpower. in terms of the matter is, i don't think there's going to be a decline. the united states would be the one superpower for a long time to come. yet there've issue we get excited about and some people on the side of the atlantic is the future of europe and the e.u. a
in the worth the misery of refugees in the 60 years in camps in lebanon and syria and the people of gaza by the israeli blockade in the west bank occupation. so why is it that he makes a statement today, which in effect says the u.s. and israel's diplomatic object is our holding a veto over our vote at the u.n. tomorrow? canal from the side of history not talk about them though for unconditional recognition of palestine? >> i don't think i was talking about the hand of history. cozy tony blair phrase. most mac but i go back to this point that we need a negotiation. he asked why the opinions of israel and the united states matter so much. that's because we will only help alleviate the problem and hope decisively those people with the negotiated settlement with israel. that means of course one has to allow for opinion in israel as well, which is the nation in the world that has the closest relationships with israel, the biggest leverage of the foreign policy decisions and the united states and that is why we have to have new regard for their opinion as well. that is the practical and diplo
it be in the middle east which you read about everyday, whether it be syria, whether it be iran, pakistan. the sunni-shia fault lines in the middle east, where there be out in the pacific in china. we look at what is going on with the islands within the pacific, korea and 29-year-old leader in charge of korea. what is he going to do in the future? we have narcoterrorism and transnational narco-terrorism. what does that mean to the future and security of our country? i don't know. these are questions we have to take a look at and these are questions that we have to be prepared to operate in. the other thing that i have learned frankly the hard way over the last several years is that you also have what i call opportunists, who will try to take advantage of this instability in destabilizing influence and nascent governments are failing governments and these opportunists may be unpredictable. i always use iraq as an example. there are lots of opportunists in iraq, iran, turkey, saudi arabia and nonstate actors all opportunists trying to take advantage of the situation. how does that project itself aroun
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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